Nov 26, 2015
At the working meeting of members of the International Board of Barents Press in Saariselkä, in the cottage owned by the Union of journalists of Finland, there is no Internet. And for quite a long time there was no TV. And other forms of communication. Journalists must break from information talking, reading, sitting by the fireplace, sweating in the sauna and diving into the icy river.
Nov 17, 2015

The festival of documentary films and television programs "Northern Character-2015" will be held 26-28 November in Murmansk at several cultural and artistic sites involving in its orbit people of different ages, occupations and interests.


Oct 29, 2015

The Russian legislation on mass media is becoming tougher and more extensive.  How can journalists and media work under the circumstances – this was in the focus of discussion at the seminar the Center  for Defense of Rights of Journalists and Media (project Barents Press – ed.) held in Murmansk.

Dec 20, 2014

Radio station in Karelia subjected to censorship

Jan 31, 2011

The brief (3-4 minutes) “Special Angle” weekly review hosted on the Militseiskaya Volna (Police Wave) radio station in Petrozavodsk by journalist Valery Potashov since July 2010 used to highlight the most significant facts of the past week, commenting on every event that caused broad public repercussions. Now the program is closed.


When the project was just being launched, the station management and Potashov had agreed that there would be no “taboo” topics but the commentaries would be discreet in their style. For several months, the parties had no claims to each other. Yet the latest show was banned from the air – allegedly because it might “undermine the radio station’s reputation”.

What V.Potashov chose for commenting on was by any measure an event of considerable public significance. Actually, Valery was not the first among journalists to pay attention to the fact that Karelia’s head Andrei Nelidov had been away from the workplace during the first decade of January, with no official statements made in that connection by anyone from the governor’s administration. That only made the public still more curious about where the republic’s leader had vanished so mysteriously – and this after President Medvedev’s resolute statement that no New Year holidays would be available to the heads of regions where emergency situations happened to occur. Karelia did go through a few critical situations in early January, with Nelidov’s first deputy stepping in to settle them in the governor’s stead. Where was the governor himself, after all?

That was what V.Potashov intended to clear up in his radio review. He wanted to stress the point that after A.Nelidov disappeared from the public scene, rumours flared up about his being seriously ill. According to unofficial sources, Karelia’s leader was indeed taking a course of medical treatment at one of Moscow’s hospitals.

Since his team did everything to hush up the governor’s absence from work, word went around about Nelidov’s possible reassignment to another place – one of the other points Potashov intended to make in his commentary. Neither the widely known fact of the governor’s hospitalisation nor the rumoured possibility of his early resignation could ever have been expected to sound sensational; yet the topic seemed potentially dangerous to the Militseiskaya Volna management.

Upon learning about the ban on his commentary’s going on the air, Potashov protested that decision as a clear instance of censorship. That made his further cooperation with the radio station problematic.


Anatoly Tsygankov,

Glasnost Defense Foundation staff correspondent

In the picture: Valery Potashov

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